Would you like to know more about Canine Hip Dysplasia? Watch our video infographic to learn
more.

Hear what client Michelle Pugin has to say about her companion Bené’s outcome following therapy at AHAH. 

 


The word dysplasia has its origins in Ancient Greek. ‘Dys’ meaning bad or difficult and ‘Plasis’ means formation. Hip dysplasia (HD) then implies malformation of the hip joint. The condition is genetic and has been diagnosed in many dog breeds both large and small.

The veterinary profession, the pet owning public and our dog population have been plagued with hip dysplasia for a very long time. In general, early diagnosis and the removal of affected individuals from the breeding gene pool does not seem to be having much effect on the incidence of this condition. In very specific and smaller populations, the percentage of affected dogs has decreased.

The malformation of the hip begins with a laxity/looseness of the hip joint. All puppies have normal hips at birth and for the first two months of life. Once the puppies start to walk and bear weight the laxity results in an instability of the ball and socket joint. What this means is that by managing your puppy’s environment, which includes but is not limited to nutrition, correct exercise (type, age appropriate and intensity) may positively influence the progression of the disease.

Over the last decade in South Africa, physical rehabilitation is growing as a profession. Our intention is to demonstrate that both young and older dogs with Hip Dysplasia do respond positively to a focused and controlled exercise program and physical rehabilitation. Animal Health and Hydro encourages you to enter into a partnership with us (or another rehab centre) in order to positively manage hip dysplasia in affected individuals.

Animal Health and Hydro will be launching an online workshop on Hip Dysplasia early in 2020 which will teach you everything you need yo know about Hip Dysplasia.